Books By: Grotius, Hugo

Author
Title
Categories
Collection
Commentary on the Law of Prize and Booty

Commentary on the Law of Prize and Booty By Hugo Grotius
Edited and with an Introduction by Martine Julia van Ittersum

Natural Law and E...

This Liberty Fund edition of Commentary on the Law of Prize and Booty is based on the one prepared by Gwladys L. Williams and Walter H. Zeydel for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. It combines the original text and new material.

Free Sea The

The Free Sea By Hugo Grotius
Translated by Richard Hakluyt
Edited and with an Introduction by David Armitage

Natural Law and E...

Liberty Fund’s edition of The Free Sea is the only translation of Grotius’s masterpiece undertaken in his own lifetime, left in manuscript by the English historian, Richard Hakluyt (1552–1616). It also contains William Welwod’s critique of Grotius (reprinted for the first time since the seventeenth century) and Grotius’s reply to Welwod. These documents provide an indispensable introduction to modern ideas of sovereignty and property as they emerged from the early-modern tradition of natural law.

Rights of War and Peace The

The Rights of War and Peace By Hugo Grotius
Edited and with an Introduction by Richard Tuck

Natural Law and E...

Since the nineteenth century, Hugo Grotius’s Rights of War and Peace has been the classic work in modern international law, laying the foundation for a universal code of law.

Truth of the Christian Religion with Jean Le Clercs Notes and Additions The

The Truth of the Christian Religion with Jean Le Clerc's Notes and Additions By Hugo Grotius
Translated by John Clarke (1743)
Edited and with an Introduction by Maria Rosa Antognazza

Natural Law and E...

Grotius’s The Truth of the Christian Religion was first published in Leiden in 1627 in Latin. Written in plain and direct language for his countrymen, this short work aimed to show those who would encounter pagans, Muslims, and Jews that the Christian religion was the true revealed religion. In addition to “fortifying” the beliefs of his fellow Christians, the treatise intended to convince non-Christians of “the reasonableness of believing and embracing the Christian Religion above any other.”