Books

Author
Title
Categories
Collection
organization of inquiry the

The Organization of Inquiry By Gordon Tullock
Edited and with an Introduction by Charles K. Rowley

Economics

The Organization of Inquiry, the third volume in Liberty Fund’s The Selected Works of Gordon Tullock, was originally published by Duke University Press in 1966. This is a treatise by one of the most stalwart practitioners of the scientific method in political economy—Gordon Tullock. Charles K. Rowley, Duncan Black Professor of Economics at George Mason University, writes in his introduction to this book, “From a purely technical perspective, this book stands out as his [Tullock’s] best-written single authored work. The book sets out his own views on scientific method—views that he would faithfully reflect in all of his subsequent scholarship.”

origin and principles of the american revolution compared with the origin and principles of the french revolution the

The Origin and Principles of the American Revolution, Compared with the Origin and Principles of the French Revolution By Friedrich Gentz
Edited and with an Introduction by Peter Koslowski
Translated by John Quincy Adams

American Founding American History Political Thought

The Origin and Principles of the American Revolution is perhaps one of the most important books written on the American Revolution by a European author. It is an original study of the subject by a conservative, objective German observer who acknowledges the legitimacy of the American Revolution, but also asserts at the same time that it was not a revolution but a legitimate transition.

origin of the american revolution  and growth of the american revolution

Origin of the American Revolution: 1759–1766 and Growth of the American Revolution: 1766–1775 By Bernhard Knollenberg
Edited and with a Foreword by Bernard W. Sheehan

American Founding American History

In his two volumes on the Revolution, Bernhard Knollenberg provides a basic narrative of events with extensive citations to the sources and a thorough discussion of the historiography. He concentrates on the political and constitutional clash between Parliament and the colonies that led to the Revolution. Social, economic, and intellectual history enter the story where needed, but Knollenberg was essentially a political historian. Although steeped in the sources and scrupulous about the facts, he wrote Whig history. His sympathies lay with the Americans. He believed that the British ministries were responsible for the crumbling of the empire and that the Americans represented the cause of liberty.

origin of the american revolution ndash

Origin of the American Revolution: 1759–1766 By Bernhard Knollenberg
Edited and with a Foreword by Bernard W. Sheehan

American Founding American History

Origin of the American Revolution is the first of Bernhard Knollenberg’s two-part history concerning the basis of the conflict between England and its North American colonies from 1759 to 1766.

origin of the distinction of ranks the

The Origin of the Distinction of Ranks By John Millar
Edited and with an Introduction by Aaron Garrett

Natural Law and E...

The Origin of the Distinction of Ranks is one of the major products of the Scottish Enlightenment and a masterpiece of jurisprudence and social theory. Drawing on Adam Smith’s four-stages theory of history and the natural law’s traditional division of domestic duties into those toward servants, children, and women, Millar provides a rich historical analysis of the ways in which progressive economic change transforms the nature of authority.

origins of the common law

Origins of the Common Law By Arthur R. Hogue

History Law

This introductory analysis of the origin and early development of the English common law provides an excellent grounding for the beginning student as well as the experienced scholar of legal history.

pacificushelvidius debates of  the

The Pacificus-Helvidius Debates of 1793–1794: Toward the Completion of the American Founding By Alexander Hamilton (Pacificus)
and James Madison (Helvidius)
Edited and with an Introduction by Morton J. Frisch

American Founding American History Political Thought

The Pacificus-Helvidius Debates of 1793–1794 matched Hamilton and Madison in the first chapter of an enduring discussion about the proper roles of executive and legislative branches in the conduct of American foreign policy. Ignited by President Washington’s Neutrality Proclamation of 1793, which annulled the eleventh article of America’s treaty with France of 1778, the debate addressed whether Washington had the authority to declare America neutral, despite the early alliance treaty with France. The Liberty Fund edition brings together for the first time all the relevant original documents of this controversy.

pamphlets and papers

Pamphlets and Papers 1809–1811 By David Ricardo
Edited by Piero Sraffa with the Collaboration of
M. H. Dobb

Economics

This volume focuses on Ricardo’s shorter essays printed in the Morning Chronicle, which deal exclusively with his thoughts on the inflationary monetary policy of the Bank of England and Britain’s consequent Bullion Crises. In these essays, the genesis of Ricardo’s theory of “hard money” emerges as a tool to hedge against inflation using metallic currency. The Bullion Committee, created by the House of Commons in 1819, subsequently adopted his recommendations. His writings here gave rise to the currency school of hard money.

pamphlets and papers

Pamphlets and Papers 1815–1823 By David Ricardo
Edited by Piero Sraffa with the Collaboration of
M. H. Dobb

Economics

This volume contains a collection of assorted short essays written for publication in the latter part of David Ricardo’s life from 1815 to 1823. These essays include: “An Essay on the Influence of a low Price of Corn on the Profits of Stock” (1815), “Proposals for the Economical and Secure Currency” (1816), “Funding System” (1820), “On Protection to Agriculture” (1822), and “Plan for the Establishment of a National Bank.”

pennsylvania and the federal constitution

Pennsylvania and the Federal Constitution, 1787–1788 Edited by John Bach McMaster and
Frederick D. Stone

American Founding American History Political Thought

In Pennsylvania and the Federal Constitution, 1787–1788, John Bach McMaster, a professor of American history, and Frederick D. Stone, librarian of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, assembled newspaper articles, editorials, and records about the debates in Pennsylvania’s ratifying convention. In addition to speeches and essays by both supporters and opponents of the Constitution, noninterpretive editorial comments are presented to introduce the documents and place them in the appropriate historical context. Also included in the volume are biographical sketches of key figures in Pennsylvania during this significant period of the American Founding, including Benjamin Franklin, Gouverneur Morris, Benjamin Rush, and James Wilson.

perfectibility of man the

The Perfectibility of Man By John Passmore

Political Thought

A reviewer of the original edition in 1970 of The Perfectibility of Man well summarizes the scope and significance of this renowned work by one of the leading philosophers of the twentieth century: “Beginning with an analytic discussion of the various ways in which perfectibility has been interpreted, Professor Passmore traces its long history from the Greeks to the present day, by way of Christianity, orthodox and heterodox, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, anarchism, utopias, communism, psychoanalysis, and evolutionary theories of man and society. Both in its broad sweep and in countless supporting reflections, it is a journey through spiritual scenery of the most majestic and exhilarating kind.” Thoroughly and elegantly, Passmore explores the history of the idea of perfectibility—manifest in the ideology of perfectibilism—and its consequences, which have invariably been catastrophic for individual liberty and responsibility in private, social, economic, and political life.

philosophiae moralis institutio compendiaria with a short introduction to moral philosophy

Philosophiae Moralis Institutio Compendiaria, with A Short Introduction to Moral Philosophy By Francis Hutcheson
Edited and with an Introduction by Luigi Turco

Natural Law and E...

In this new, dual-language edition, Hutcheson’s Latin Philosophiae Moralis Institutio Compendiaria is presented on facing pages with its English translation, A Short Introduction to Moral Philosophy, together with all the relevant alterations of the 1745 edition relating to the 1742 edition of the Institutio, including all the omissions and additions by the translator in the Short Introduction.

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