Books Category: Economics

Author
Title
Categories
Collection
Interventionism

Interventionism: An Economic Analysis By Ludwig von Mises
Edited by Bettina Bien Greaves

Economics

Interventionism provides Mises’s analysis of the problems of government interference in business from the Austrian school perspective. Written in 1940, before the United States was officially involved in World War II, this book offers a rare insight into the war economies of Hitler’s Germany and Mussolini’s Italy. Mises criticizes the pre–World War II democratic governments for favoring socialism and interventionism over capitalist methods of production. Mises contends that government’s economic role should be limited because of the negative political and social consequences of the economic policy of interventionism.

Introducing Market Forces into Public Services

Introducing Market Forces into “Public” Services By Arthur Seldon
Edited and with a New Introduction by Colin Robinson

Economics

Introducing Market Forces into “Public” Services is the fourth volume in Liberty Fund’s The Collected Works of Arthur Seldon. It brings together six of Seldon’s most pivotal essays that discuss his alternative proposals for paying for “public” services rather than through coercive taxation. Specifically, Seldon focuses on the varied use of vouchers and the choices people have regarding purchasing or receiving such public services as health care and education. The recurring theme, as noted in Colin Robinson’s introduction, is that “non-market provision, financed by taxpayers, leads to a fatal disconnection between suppliers and consumers.”

Justice and Its Surroundings

Justice and Its Surroundings By Anthony de Jasay

Economics Political Thought

Anthony de Jasay breaks new ground with Justice and Its Surroundings—a collection of trenchant essays that seek to redefine the concept of justice and to highlight the frontier between it and the surrounding issues that encroach upon it and are mistakenly associated with it.

Keynesian Episode The

The Keynesian Episode: A Reassessment By W. H. Hutt

Economics

The late W. H. Hutt was a preeminent and persistent critic of the economic theories of John Maynard Keynes. In The Keynesian Episode, he presents a comprehensive review of Keynes’s General Theory, including the finest critique to date of the Acceleration Principle. He questions the very legitimacy of Keynes’s fundamental epistemology.

Law and Economics

Law and Economics By Gordon Tullock
Edited and with an Introduction by Charles K. Rowley

Economics

Gordon Tullock’s innovative scholarship in law and economics shines in this volume. It includes, in full, his famous book The Logic of Law, the first book to analyze the law from the perspective of economics. It also includes an influential and controversial monograph, The Case against the Common Law, the best chapters from his book, Trials on Trial, as well as a sequence of influential articles in the field of law and economics.

Lectures on Jurisprudence

Lectures on Jurisprudence By Adam Smith
Edited by R. L. Meek, D. D. Raphael, and P. G. Stein

Economics Glasgow Edition o...

Smith’s Lectures on Jurisprudence, originally delivered at the University of Glasgow in 1762–1763, present his “theory of the rules by which civil government ought to be directed.” The chief purpose of government, according to Smith, is to preserve justice; and “the object of justice is security from injury.” The state must protect the individual’s right to his person, property, reputation, and social relations.

Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres

Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres By Adam Smith
Edited by J. C. Bryce

Economics Glasgow Edition o...

The “Notes of Dr. Smith’s Rhetorick Lectures,” discovered in 1958 by a University of Aberdeen professor, consists of lecture notes taken by two of Smith’s students at the University of Glasgow in 1762–1763. There are thirty lectures in the collection, all on rhetoric and the different kinds or characteristics of style.

Letters

Letters 1810–1815 By David Ricardo
Edited by Piero Sraffa with the Collaboration of M. H. Dobb

Economics

David Ricardo was born in London in 1772. His father, a successful stockbroker, introduced him to the Stock Exchange at the formative age of fourteen. During his career in finance, he amassed a personal fortune which allowed him to retire at the age of forty-two. Thereafter, he pursued a political career and further developed his economic ideas and policy proposals. A man of very little formal education, Ricardo arguably became, with the exception of Adam Smith, the most influential political economist of all time.

Letters

Letters 1821–1823 By David Ricardo
Edited by Piero Sraffa with the Collaboration of M. H. Dobb

Economics

David Ricardo was born in London in 1772. His father, a successful stockbroker, introduced him to the Stock Exchange at the formative age of fourteen. During his career in finance, he amassed a personal fortune which allowed him to retire at the age of forty-two. Thereafter, he pursued a political career and further developed his economic ideas and policy proposals. A man of very little formal education, Ricardo arguably became, with the exception of Adam Smith, the most influential political economist of all time.

Letters

Letters 1819–1821 By David Ricardo
Edited by Piero Sraffa with the Collaboration of M. H. Dobb

Economics

This period of Ricardo’s life witnessed his entrance into Parliament as a member of the House of Commons where he became an influential advocate of free trade through his opposition to Britain’s restrictive “Corn laws.”

Letters

Letters 1816–1818 By David Ricardo
Edited by Piero Sraffa with the Collaboration of M. H. Dobb

Economics

David Ricardo was born in London in 1772. His father, a successful stockbroker, introduced him to the Stock Exchange at the formative age of fourteen. During his career in finance, he amassed a personal fortune which allowed him to retire at the age of forty-two. Thereafter, he pursued a political career and further developed his economic ideas and policy proposals. A man of very little formal education, Ricardo arguably became, with the exception of Adam Smith, the most influential political economist of all time.

Liberalism

Liberalism: The Classical Tradition By Ludwig von Mises
Edited by Bettina Bien Greaves

Economics

This book presents the theoretical and practical arguments for liberalism in the classical tradition as defined by Mises as “the liberal doctrine of the harmony of the rightly understood interests of all members of a free society founded on the principle of private ownership of the means of production.” The foundation of liberalism, Mises says, rests on an understanding and appreciation of private property, social cooperation, the freedom idea, ethics and morality, democracy, and the legitimate role of government. Also in this book, Mises contrasts liberalism with other conceivable systems of social organization such as socialism, communism, and fascism.