Books By: Burckhardt, Jacob

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Cartas

Cartas De Jacob Burckhardt

Spanish/Portugues...

Seleção Alexander Dru
Introdução à Edição Brasileira Luiz Costa Lima
Tradução Renato Rezende

Judgments on History and Historians

Judgments on History and Historians By Jacob Burckhardt
Translated by Harry Zohn
Foreword by Alberto R. Coll

History

Renowned for his Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy and Reflections on History, Jacob Burckhardt (1818–1897) has well been described as “the most civilized historian of the nineteenth century.” Judgments on History and Historians consists of records collected by Emil Dürr from Burckhardt’s lecture notes for history courses at the University of Basel from 1865 to 1885. The 149 brief sections span five eras: Antiquity, the Middle Ages, History from 1450 to 1598, the History of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, and the Age of Revolution.

Juicios sobre la historia y los historiadores

Juicios sobre la historia y los historiadores Por Jacob Burckhardt

Spanish/Portugues...

Traducido del inglés por Azucena Galettini traducción
revisada por Teresa Rossmann

Letters of Jacob Burckhardt The

The Letters of Jacob Burckhardt By Jacob Burckhardt
Selected, Edited, and Translated by Alexander Dru

History

As a rule, an author’s correspondence possesses only a secondary interest, but Jacob Burckhardt’s letters are of primary interest to students of history because of the nature of the man and of his major writings. Judgments on History and Historians, for example, consists not of Burckhardt’s own lectures, but of notes on his lectures by one of his greatest students. It is because Burckhardt was a remarkably private man who believed that contemplation was the key to insight into the nature of man and history, and because his approach to the study of history was reflective rather than systematic or dogmatic, that his letters possess a singular significance. For it is in his letters that Burckhardt provides additional and even personal observations on his learned explorations of antiquity, the Renaissance, and modern Europe, and it is in his letters that Burckhardt muses on the consequences that he believed—and feared—awaited a Europe that had given itself almost wholly to a rationalistic and materialistic understanding of history and destiny.